Topic 2

The History of Students' Own State or Region

Standard 3

The people, events, problems, and ideas that created the history of their state.

Standard 3A: The student understands the history of indigenous peoples who first lived in his or her state or region.

GRADE LEVEL THEREFORE THE STUDENT IS ABLE TO
K-4 Draw upon data in paintings and artifacts to hypothesize about the culture of the early Hawaiians or Native Americans who are known to have lived in the state or region, e.g., the Anasazi of the Southwest, the Makah of the Northwest coast, the Eskimos/Inupiat of Alaska, the Creeks of the Southeast, the Mississippians (Cahokia), or the Mound Builders. [Formulate historical questions]
K-4 Draw upon legends and myths of the Native Americans or Hawaiians who lived in students' state or region in order to describe personal accounts of their history. [Read historical narratives imaginatively]
3-4 Compare and contrast how Native American or Hawaiian life today differs from the life of these same groups over 100 years ago. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas]

Standard 3B: The student understands the history of the first European, African, and/or Asian-Pacific explorers and settlers who came to his or her state or region.

GRADE LEVEL THEREFORE THE STUDENT IS ABLE TO
3-4 Gather data in order to analyze geographic, economic, and religious reasons that brought the first explorers and settlers to the state or region. [Obtain historical data]
3-4 Reconstruct in timelines the order of early explorations and settlements including explorers, early settlements, and cities. [Establish temporal order]
K-4 Examine visual data in order to describe ways in which early settlers adapted to, utilized, and changed the environment. [Draw upon visual data]
3-4 Analyze some of the interactions that occurred between the Native Americans or Hawaiians and the first European, African, and Asian-Pacific explorers and settlers in the students' state or region. [Read historical narratives imaginatively]
K-4 Use a variety of sources to construct a historical narrative about daily life in the early settlements of the student's state or region. [Obtain historical data]

Standard 3C: The student understands the various other groups from regions throughout the world who came into the his or her own state or region over the long-ago and recent past.

GRADE LEVEL THEREFORE THE STUDENT IS ABLE TO
3-4 Develop a timeline on their state or region and identify the first inhabitants who lived there, each successive group of arrivals, and significant changes that developed over the history of their state or region. [Establish temporal order]
K-4 Use a variety of visual data, fiction and nonfiction sources, and speakers to identify the groups that have come into the state or region and to generate ideas about why they came. [Obtain historical data]
K-4 Examine photographs and pictures of people from the various racial and ethnic groups of varying socioeconomic status who lived in the state 100-200 years ago in order to hypothesize about their lives, feelings, plans, and dreams, and to compare ways in which their experiences were similar and different. [Formulate historical questions]
3-4 Examine newspaper and magazine accounts and construct interview questions for a written, telephone, or in-person interview with a recent immigrant in order to discover why they came, what their life was like, and to describe some of the experiences that they have had in adjusting to the state or region. [Obtain historical data]
3-4 Draw upon census data and historical accounts in order to describe patterns and changes in population over a period of time in a particular city or town in the students' state or region. [Draw upon historical data]
3-4 Describe the problems, including prejudice and intolerance, as well as the opportunities that various groups who have lived in their state or region have experienced in housing, the workplace, and the community. [Appreciate historical perspectives]
3-4 Draw upon historical narratives to examine the sources of strength and determination, such as family, church, synagogue, community, or fraternal organizations that various groups drew upon in attempts to overcome problems during this period. [Consider multiple perspectives]

Standard 3D: The student understands the interactions among all these groups throughout the history of his or her state.

GRADE LEVEL THEREFORE THE STUDENT IS ABLE TO
3-4 List in chronological order the major historical events that are part of the state's history. [Establish temporal order]
3-4 Analyze the significance of major events in the state's history, their impact on people then and now, and their relationship to the history of the nation. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]
3-4 Read historical narratives to describe how the territory or region attained its statehood. [Reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage]
3-4 Identify historical problems or events in the state and analyze the way they were solved and/or the ways that they continue to be addressed. [Identify issues and problems in the past]
3-4 Examine various written accounts in order to identify and describe regional or state examples of major historical events and developments that involved interaction among various groups (e.g., the Alamo, the Underground Railroad, the building of the Transcontinental Railroad, and the California Gold Rush). [Consider multiple perspectives]
3-4 Investigate the influence of geography on the history of the state or region and identify issues and approaches to problems such as land use and environmental problems. [Reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage]

Standard 3E: The student understands the ideas that were significant in the development of the state and that helped to forge its unique identity.

GRADE LEVEL THEREFORE THE STUDENT IS ABLE TO
K-4 Draw upon visual and other data to identify symbols, slogans, or mottoes, and research why they represent the state. [Draw upon visual data]
3-4 Analyze how the ideas of significant people affected the history of their state. [Assess the importance of the individual in history]
K-4 Research in order to explain why important buildings, statues, monuments, and place names are associated with the state's history. [Obtain historical data]
3-4 Draw upon a variety of sources to describe the unique historical conditions that influenced the formation of the state. [Obtain historical data]
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